Laurel & Hardy

25. Two Tars (1928)

'Two Tars' is a spectacular return to form for Laurel & Hardy - and thank goodness for that! This is exactly what was required following the confusing and, without wanting to sound melodramatic, traumatic experience of watching the boys' previous film 'Early to Bed'. What a relief to read the opening title cards. Gone is… Continue reading 25. Two Tars (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

24. Early to Bed (1928)

Well, I hate to say this, but I have a huge problem with this film! Let me explain. It's 1928 and the Laurel & Hardy team is now well established. Their films are no longer being distributed under the 'All-Stars' banner, the series is now labelled as out and out 'Laurel & Hardy' comedies. The… Continue reading 24. Early to Bed (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Filmed during the Spring of 1928, the opening scene of 'Should Married Men Go Home?' is one in contrast to reality. Here we see a picture of domestic bliss, as Ollie and his wife (played by Kay Deslys, returning for the second film in a row) sit cuddling on the sofa, yet behind closed doors,… Continue reading 23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

22. Their Purple Moment (1928)

Forget Silas Barnaby, Walter Long, Noah Young, Tiny Sandford, Charlie Hall, even Jimmy Finlayson. Laurel & Hardy's biggest and certainly most intimidating nemesis had to be their on-screen wives! Although the boys had had female co-stars playing their girlfriends in earlier films and also whilst acknowledging that there would be better examples to come in… Continue reading 22. Their Purple Moment (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

21. You’re Darn Tootin’ (1928)

Strangely, I want to write two very different reviews for 'You're Darn Tootin' and as I consider why this is, I'm struck by quite an interesting thought (to me anyway!).  For my first viewing, I chose to watch the DVD copy contained within the Universal 21 disc boxed set and although I had many laughs,… Continue reading 21. You’re Darn Tootin’ (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

20. From Soup to Nuts (1928)

"Newly Rich -- Mrs. Culpepper was an idol to the snobs -- And a pain in the neck to everybody else-“ Just two days after Christmas 1927, Stan and Babe were back at work on a studio stage and in front of the cameras. In response to their growing success, delivering Laurel and Hardy products… Continue reading 20. From Soup to Nuts (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

19. The Finishing Touch (1928)

  "The story of two boys who went to school for nine years - and finished in the infants" "That clever comedy team of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy are keeping busy with a two-reeler built around house building. They are abetted in their mirthquake by Dorothy Coburn and Ed Kennedy. Clyde Bruckman is the… Continue reading 19. The Finishing Touch (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

18. Leave ‘Em Laughing (1928)

"What's worse than an aching tooth at three in the morning?           - Two of them!" Since their first chance meeting in 1921, on the set of G.M. Anderson's, The Lucky Dog, Stan and Babe had danced a merry and protracted dance around each other, coming so close and yet remaining so… Continue reading 18. Leave ‘Em Laughing (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

17. The Battle of the Century (1927)

Filmed: October 5 to October 29, 1927  Released: December 31, 1927  Produced by: Hal Roach  Directed by: Clyde Bruckman              Photographed by: George Stevens  Titles by: H.M. Walker Main Cast: Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, Noah Young, Charlie Hall, Eugene Pallette, Dorothy Coburn, Anita Garvin It’s widely acknowledged that 1927 is… Continue reading 17. The Battle of the Century (1927)

Laurel & Hardy

16. Putting Pants on Philip (1927)

Filmed: September 13 to September 23, 1927 Released: December 3, 1927 Produced by: Hal Roach Directed by: Clyde Bruckman Supervised by: Leo McCarey Photographed by: George Stevens Titles by: H.M. Walker Main Cast: Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, Dorothy Coburn, Harvey Clark, Sam Lufkin As the third picture made since their official announcement as a comedy… Continue reading 16. Putting Pants on Philip (1927)