Laurel & Hardy

Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Our last blog focused on the wonderful 1929 short 'Angora Love'. As well as being a typically funny Laurel & Hardy comedy, it's also a very significant film in Stan & Ollie's canon, as it has the distinction of being the very last silent film they ever made together (with the exception of 'The Tree… Continue reading Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Laurel & Hardy

32. Double Whoopee (1929)

Two of the most endearing of all Laurel & Hardy's qualities, to me at least, is their blind faith in their own abilities and their determination to succeed in whatever they're doing. No matter how suitable, or perhaps more appropriately, un-suitable they may be to the task at hand, they set about it with an… Continue reading 32. Double Whoopee (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

28. Liberty (1929)

'Liberty' is a great comedy and, for me, ranks in the top four of Laurel & Hardy's silent shorts. It's strange in a way, when you think that a good portion of the film was actually the unwanted bits, the cast-offs from their previous outing. That may seem remarkable, but it's absolutely true. A number… Continue reading 28. Liberty (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

26. Habeas Corpus (1928)

Whilst I don't think this is one of their best films 'Habeas Corpus' has unique historical importance in the Laurel & Hardy canon. It's also a film that often appears to fly under the radar of the casual L&H fan - but to be honest that's probably not a disaster. Although I hate to negatively… Continue reading 26. Habeas Corpus (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Filmed during the Spring of 1928, the opening scene of 'Should Married Men Go Home?' is one in contrast to reality. Here we see a picture of domestic bliss, as Ollie and his wife (played by Kay Deslys, returning for a second film in a row) sit cuddling on the sofa, yet behind closed doors… Continue reading 23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)