Laurel & Hardy

43. Night Owls (1930)

After their brief sojourn at MGM, filming 'The Rogue Song', the boys were soon back in front of the cameras at the Hal Roach 'Lot of Fun' for business as usual...and that business was 'Night Owls'. The story of 'Night Owls' is an interesting one, as Laurel & Hardy historians, including  Randy Skretvedt, Glenn Mitchell… Continue reading 43. Night Owls (1930)

Laurel & Hardy

39. Perfect Day (1929)

For Stan, Ollie, their wives and of course the gout-ridden Uncle Edgar Kennedy, this was far from a perfect day. Yet, all of the film's ingredients and especially the talent on display make the film almost the perfect comedy. Indeed Glenn Mitchell in his 'Laurel & Hardy Encyclopedia' describes 'Perfect Day' as one of the… Continue reading 39. Perfect Day (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

35. Unaccustomed As We Are (1929)

This is such an interesting little film. Laurel & Hardy's very first talking picture, 'Unaccustomed As We Are' is a truly historic and pivotal moment in the boys' career and one can only wonder at the anxieties Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy must have felt leading up to the filming and ultimately the release of… Continue reading 35. Unaccustomed As We Are (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Our last blog focused on the wonderful 1929 short 'Angora Love'. As well as being a typically funny Laurel & Hardy comedy, it's also a very significant film in Stan & Ollie's canon, as it has the distinction of being the very last silent film they ever made together (with the exception of 'The Tree… Continue reading Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Laurel & Hardy

34. Angora Love (1929)

Well, this is it! Laurel & Hardy's farewell to silent pictures. The end of an era, their last of a dying breed. If you've joined us on the Blog's journey so far, or independently actually sat and watched each film in order (the order that they were made, not released), I hope you've gotten as… Continue reading 34. Angora Love (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

33. Bacon Grabbers (1929)

What's the one thing a die-hard Laurel & Hardy fan wants more than anything? Well, arguably its to find a Hal Roach era film that they've never seen before. It's the Holy Grail. To most fans, finding a copy of 'Hat's Off' (1927) or the boys' remaining missing sequences from The Rogue Song (1930) are… Continue reading 33. Bacon Grabbers (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

25. Two Tars (1928)

'Two Tars' is a spectacular return to form for Laurel & Hardy - and thank goodness for that! This is exactly what was required following the confusing and, without wanting to sound melodramatic, traumatic experience of watching the boys' previous film 'Early to Bed' (see the blog for details).  What a relief to read the… Continue reading 25. Two Tars (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Filmed during the Spring of 1928, the opening scene of 'Should Married Men Go Home?' is one in contrast to reality. Here we see a picture of domestic bliss, as Ollie and his wife (played by Kay Deslys, returning for a second film in a row) sit cuddling on the sofa, yet behind closed doors… Continue reading 23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

22. Their Purple Moment (1928)

Forget Silas Barnaby, Walter Long, Noah Young, Tiny Sandford, Charlie Hall, even Jimmy Finlayson. Laurel & Hardy's biggest and certainly most intimidating nemesis had to be their on-screen wives! Although the boys had had female co-stars playing their girlfriends in earlier films and also whilst acknowledging that there would be better examples to come in… Continue reading 22. Their Purple Moment (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

21. You’re Darn Tootin’ (1928)

Strangely, I want to write two very different reviews for 'You're Darn Tootin' and as I consider why this is, I'm struck by quite an interesting thought (to me anyway!).  For my first viewing, I chose to watch the DVD copy contained within the Universal 21 disc boxed set and although I had many laughs,… Continue reading 21. You’re Darn Tootin’ (1928)