Laurel & Hardy

37. Men O’ War (1929)

It really is quite hard to believe that 'Men O'War' was only Laurel & Hardy's third talking picture! Early talkies just don't get much better than this. Whilst their first outing, 'Unaccustomed As We Are' (1929), was over-loaded with dialogue and their second offering, 'Berth Marks' (1929), was mostly visual pantomime, the team at the… Continue reading 37. Men O’ War (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

36. Berth Marks (1929)

Laurel and Hardy's second outing in the world of talking pictures, couldn't be much more different than their first. Where 'Unaccustomed As We Are' was a film that was self-consciously all about dialogue, 'Berth Marks' returns the boys back to basics, back to films packed with visual gags. In a way, I found this a… Continue reading 36. Berth Marks (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Our last blog focused on the wonderful 1929 short 'Angora Love'. As well as being a typically funny Laurel & Hardy comedy, it's also a very significant film in Stan & Ollie's canon, as it has the distinction of being the very last silent film they ever made together (with the exception of 'The Tree… Continue reading Tipping the hat to Laurel & Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Laurel & Hardy

34. Angora Love (1929)

Well, this is it! Laurel & Hardy's farewell to silent pictures. The end of an era, their last of a dying breed. If you've joined us on the Blog's journey so far, or independently actually sat and watched each film in order (the order that they were made, not released), I hope you've gotten as… Continue reading 34. Angora Love (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

33. Bacon Grabbers (1929)

What's the one thing a die-hard Laurel & Hardy fan wants more than anything? Well, arguably its to find a Hal Roach era film that they've never seen before. It's the Holy Grail. To most fans, finding a copy of 'Hat's Off' (1927) or the boys' remaining missing sequences from The Rogue Song (1930) are… Continue reading 33. Bacon Grabbers (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

32. Double Whoopee (1929)

Two of the most endearing of all Laurel & Hardy's qualities, to me at least, is their blind faith in their own abilities and their determination to succeed in whatever they're doing. No matter how suitable, or perhaps more appropriately, un-suitable they may be to the task at hand, they set about it with an… Continue reading 32. Double Whoopee (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

29. Wrong Again (1929)

'Wrong Again' is one of those films that I hadn't watched in ages and I'd forgotten just how good it is! If you haven't seen it before, or if it's been a while, I encourage you to watch it - it's classic Laurel & Hardy! Filmed at the end of November 1928, 'Wrong Again' was… Continue reading 29. Wrong Again (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

25. Two Tars (1928)

'Two Tars' is a spectacular return to form for Laurel & Hardy - and thank goodness for that! This is exactly what was required following the confusing and, without wanting to sound melodramatic, traumatic experience of watching the boys' previous film 'Early to Bed' (see the blog for details).  What a relief to read the… Continue reading 25. Two Tars (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Filmed during the Spring of 1928, the opening scene of 'Should Married Men Go Home?' is one in contrast to reality. Here we see a picture of domestic bliss, as Ollie and his wife (played by Kay Deslys, returning for a second film in a row) sit cuddling on the sofa, yet behind closed doors… Continue reading 23. Should Married Men Go Home? (1928)

Laurel & Hardy

18. Leave ‘Em Laughing (1928)

The end of 1927 heralded a significant threat to Laurel & Hardy's careers, just as they were starting to take off. 'Leave 'Em Laughing' was released at the end of January 1928, but was written and filmed in October of the previous year - the very same month that saw the release, by Warner Bros.,… Continue reading 18. Leave ‘Em Laughing (1928)