Laurel & Hardy

43. Night Owls (1930)

Filming began October 30, 1929, to November 11, 1929 Released January 4, 1930, Two Reels                    Produced by Hal Roach, Directed by James Parrott, Photographed by George Stevens,  Sound by Elmer Raguse Main Cast: Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy, Edgar Kennedy, James Finlayson, Anders Randolf After their brief… Continue reading 43. Night Owls (1930)

Laurel & Hardy

42. The Rogue Song (1930) (Lost Film)

Just like the silent short 'Hats Off' (1927), The Rogue Song has frustrated Laurel & Hardy fans for decades, as it is another 'lost' film. However, whereas 'Hats Off' is lost in its entirety, fragments of varying length and quality of 'The Rogue Song' have surfaced across the globe over the years, giving us tantalising glimpses… Continue reading 42. The Rogue Song (1930) (Lost Film)

Laurel & Hardy

41. The Hoose-Gow (1929)

As soon as 'They Go Boom' was in the can, the Roach Studios closed down for their annual month-long vacation. This was certainly a well-earned break for the boys who had already turned out twelve fantastic comedy shorts in the first seven months of that year alone, not including their cameo appearance in 'The Hollywood… Continue reading 41. The Hoose-Gow (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

40. They Go Boom! (1929)

Despite its title, 'They Go Boom!' is not an explosive Laurel & Hardy comedy - at least not compared with their own high standards anyway! Yet, to be fair, it does have its funny moments, as you would expect with Messrs. Laurel, Hardy, and Charlie Hall pitted once more against each other. Although I never like… Continue reading 40. They Go Boom! (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

39. Perfect Day (1929)

For Stan, Ollie, their wives and of course the gout-ridden Uncle Edgar Kennedy, this was far from a perfect day. Yet, all of the film's ingredients and especially the talent on display make the film almost the perfect comedy. Indeed Glenn Mitchell in his 'Laurel & Hardy Encyclopedia' describes 'Perfect Day' as one of the… Continue reading 39. Perfect Day (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

38. The Hollywood Revue of 1929

I've always known that Laurel & Hardy are magic, but seeing them here playing a pair of magicians seals it! One particular magic trick they manage to pull off is to make 'The Hollywood Revue of 1929' actually worth watching - well, for about six minutes anyway. Okay, so perhaps I'm being a little unfair,… Continue reading 38. The Hollywood Revue of 1929

Laurel & Hardy

37. Men O’ War (1929)

It really is quite hard to believe that 'Men O'War' was only Laurel & Hardy's third talking picture! Early talkies just don't get much better than this. Whilst their first outing, 'Unaccustomed As We Are' (1929), was over-loaded with dialogue and their second offering, 'Berth Marks' (1929), was mostly visual pantomime, the team at the… Continue reading 37. Men O’ War (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

36. Berth Marks (1929)

Laurel and Hardy's second outing in the world of talking pictures, couldn't be much more different than their first. Where 'Unaccustomed As We Are' was a film that was self-consciously all about dialogue, 'Berth Marks' returns the boys back to basics, back to films packed with visual gags. In a way, I found this a… Continue reading 36. Berth Marks (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

35. Unaccustomed As We Are (1929)

This is such an interesting little film. Laurel & Hardy's very first talking picture, 'Unaccustomed As We Are' is a truly historic and pivotal moment in the boys' career and one can only wonder at the anxieties Mr. Laurel and Mr. Hardy must have felt leading up to the filming and ultimately the release of… Continue reading 35. Unaccustomed As We Are (1929)

Laurel & Hardy

Tipping the hat to Laurel and Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)

Angora Love, as well as being a typically funny Laurel & Hardy comedy, is also a very significant film in Stan & Ollie's canon, as it has the distinction of being the very last silent film they ever made together (with the exception of 'The Tree in a Test Tube' (1943), but that doesn't really… Continue reading Tipping the hat to Laurel and Hardy’s Silent Shorts (1921 – 1929)